5*Tcu (*Tudor City Undercover): The Cooperative Weather Edition

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The Cooperative Weather EDITION

Greetings, 5tcu-ers!

Yes, it is summer already. Amazing how the weather and seasons affect us all. I know, I for one, am ready to enjoy some fun outdoors this summer! Hopefully, the rain breaks soon.

Speaking of outdoor fun, we at 5*Tcu always do the things we recommend, and last night I saw Julius Caesar – Shakespeare in the Park, the Public’s annual production. An excellent old friend thought of me when she picked up tickets, and the season is still early enough that if you stop by Central Park’s Delacorte Theatre in the late morning, you might also get lucky. But this modern day take on power – Trump references and all, including some very amusing costuming – is worth the effort. Among others, it features Corey Stoll and Elizabeth Marvel of “House of Cards” fame as Brutus and Marc Anthony. Here is what the New Yorker says about the production. Also for the outdoors, movies! Everyone is getting in on the outdoor film action, not just Bryant Park. A few suggestions: Rooftop Cinema Club, in Midtown and East Williamsburg, as well as the Intrepid Museum’s Summer Movie Series, in Hell’s Kitchen, where you can watch a movie on the deck of an aircraft carrier used in World War II. It’s free, just expect military-themed films, in addition to the skyline views.

Finally, on 31 May, Book Culture is teaming up with Breaking the Silence, Harper Perennial, and the Broadway Presbyterian Church for a special event for Kingdoms of Olive and Ash: Writers Confront the Occupation, complied and edited by Michael Chabon and Ayelet Waldman. Over the past two years, Chabon and Waldman, two of today's most renowned novelists and essayists, including Colm Toibin, Dave Eggers and Asaf Gavron, have joined forces with the Israeli NGO Breaking the Silence – an organization comprised of former Israeli soldiers who served in the occupied territories and saw firsthand the injustice there – and a host of illustrious writers to tell the stories of the people on the ground in the contested territories. The event takes place at Broadway Presbyterian Church, 601 West 114th Street. Although the event is free ($17 if you want a book), RSVP here.

Also, just a reminder, while the newsletter is getting shorter, all the content of past weeks is now on www.5tcu.com! A small, small favor: if you like what I do here and if use these events, follow me on Twitter at BlindFolio, or on Facebook at The 5tcu or AM Brune.
 
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You can now hear Adrian three times per week to discuss American politics and culture on CapeTalk's Early Breakfast show

David Sedaris has kept a diary for forty years, in which he’s recorded nearly everything. These observations are the source code for his finest work and you can have it, too. See him at Powerhouse Books.

David Sedaris has kept a diary for forty years, in which he’s recorded nearly everything. These observations are the source code for his finest work and you can have it, too. See him at Powerhouse Books.

BOOK/LECTURE/FESTIVAL

The Gleaners & I (Stranger Than Fiction): Beginning with the famous Jean-François Millet painting of women gathering wheat, this film has its ever-seeking eye on gleaners: those who scour already-reaped fields for the odd potato or turnip. The investigation leads viewers from forgotten corners of the French countryside to off-hours at the green markets of Paris, following those who insist on finding a use for that which society has cast off. Stranger Than Fiction is a Tuesday night documentary series that presents an eclectic mix of documentaries followed by discussions with the filmmakers and post-show receptions. IFC Center, 323 6th Ave, West Village, 30 May, 7pm, from $17.

Breaking the Silence presents Ayalet Waldman, Michael Chabon, & Avner Gvaryahu: Michael Chabon and Ayelet Waldman, two of today's most renowned novelists and essayists, have joined forces with the Israeli NGO Breaking the Silence, an organization comprised of former Israeli soldiers who served in the occupied territories and saw firsthand the injustice there and a host of illustrious writers to tell the stories of the people on the ground in the contested territories. Congregation Beth Elohim, 274 Garfield Place, Brooklyn, 30 May, 9:30pm, from $17, includes book.

David Sedaris presents Theft by Finding: It’s no coincidence that the world’s best writers tend to keep diaries. David Sedaris has kept a diary for forty years. In his diaries, he’s recorded everything that has captured his attention: overheard comments, salacious gossip, soap opera plot twists, secrets confided by total strangers. These observations are the source code for his finest work, and with them he has honed his self-deprecation and learned to craft his cunning, surprising sentences. Now, for the first time, Sedaris shares his private writings with the world in Theft By Finding: Diaries 1977-2002. Powerhouse Books, 28 Adams Street, Dumbo, 30 May, 6pm, $35.

Book Launch: Grocery – The Buying and Selling of Food in America by Michael Ruhlman: Americans spend an estimated $650 billion annually at 38,000 grocery stores in America. Yet, most people know nothing about how they operate; how food is selected and marketed; and where that food comes from. In Grocery: The Buying and Selling of Food in America, author Michael Ruhlman dives into the mysterious world of supermarkets. PowerHouse Books, 28 Adams Street (Corner of Adams & Water Street @ the Archway), 31 May, 7pm, Free.

Eat, Drink and Be Literary: Raise a glass and share a meal with today’s most renowned authors in this unique series of literary evenings at BAMcafé. Each event includes a festive dinner by Great Performances, after which a featured author reads from his or her work and discusses the creative process.

Elif Batuman with Deborah Treisman: Elif Batuman is the author of the new novel The Idiot and the essay collection The Possessed, which was a finalist for the 2010 National Book Critics' Circle Award. Between 2010 and 2013, she was based in Istanbul and wrote about Turkey for The New Yorker, where she has been a contributor since 2006. BAM Café, 30 Lafayette Ave., 31 May, 6:30pm, from $65.

Book Launch – North Haven by Sarah Moriarty:  On an island in Maine, four siblings arrive at their sprawling, old summer place for the Fourth of July – first summer without their parents. When a substantial offer is made on the estate, the two brothers and two sisters are forced to confront issues they had hoped to keep hidden. North Haven explores the shifting allegiances between siblings as they contend with their inheritance, the truth of family lore, and even the veracity of their own memories. POWERHOUSE @ the Archway, 28 Adams Street (Corner of Adams & Water Street @ the Archway), Brooklyn, 1 June, 7pm, rsvp@powerhousearena.com.

Book Launch – Another Brooklyn By Jacqueline Welch: For August and her girls, Brooklyn was a place where they believed that they were beautiful, talented, brilliant – a part of a future that belonged to them. But beneath the hopeful veneer was another Brooklyn, a dangerous place where grown men reached for innocent girls in dark hallways, where ghosts haunted the night, where mothers disappeared. Community Bookstore, 143 7th Ave., Brooklyn, 1 June, 7pm. Free.

Book Launch – Trophy Son by Douglas Brunt:  Set against the backdrop of the professional tennis world, Trophy Son follows prodigy Anton Stratis from an isolated childhood of grueling practice under the eye of his overbearing father to his dramatic rise through the competitive world of professional tennis. Along the way, Anton finds exhilarating highs and desolate lows as he searches for an identity apart from his achievements. POWERHOUSE @ the Archway, 28 Adams Street (Corner of Adams & Water Street @ the Archway), Brooklyn, 2 June, 7pm, rsvp@powerhousearena.com.

See The Pixies at Brooklyn Steel this weekend.  

See The Pixies at Brooklyn Steel this weekend.  

CONCERT

The Pixies:  25-26 May, Brooklyn Steel

Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds: 27 May, King’s Theatre

LP: 30 May, Bowery Ballroom

Songkick, Ticketfly or Bowery Presents

SPORT

New York City Football Club

v. New England Revolution, 31 May, 7:30pm

New York Mets

v. San Diego Padres, 23-25 May, 7pm

v. Milwaukee Brewers, 29-31 May, 4pm, 7pm

Rome’s leader, Julius Caesar, is a force unlike any the city has seen. Magnetic, populist, irreverent, he seems bent on absolute power. A small band of patriots, devoted to the country’s democratic traditions, must decide how to oppose him.

Rome’s leader, Julius Caesar, is a force unlike any the city has seen. Magnetic, populist, irreverent, he seems bent on absolute power. A small band of patriots, devoted to the country’s democratic traditions, must decide how to oppose him.

THEATRE

Animal: Rachel has it all: marriage, house, career... So why does she suddenly have this creeping feeling? Did she leave something behind? Her husband thinks she needs time; her psychiatrist suggests positive thinking. But then the visions start. A darkly comic play about the underside of domesticity and the thin line between sinking and survival. Atlantic Stage 2, 330 West 16th Street, through 25 June, from $60.

1984: Based on the iconic novel by George Orwell, 1984 is the story of Winston Smith, a cog in the giant machine state of Oceania. Physically and mentally under the omnipresent eye of Big Brother, Winston has been caught struggling for scraps of love and freedom in a world awash with distrust and violence. A ferocious and provocative adaptation of one of the most prescient works of literature of the last century. Hudson Theatre, 139-141 West 44th Street, 24 May through 8 October, from $122.

Somebody’s Daughter: Alex is a fifteen year old Asian-American girl going to extremes to get her own mother to notice her. She’s a dream child – except to her parents who wish she was a boy. Luckily she finds a sympathetic ear in Kate, her irreverent guidance counselor who knows all too well what it’s like to walk in Alex’s shoes. 2ST Uptown, 2162 Broadway at 76th Street, through 18 June, from $32.

A Doll’s House Part 2: In the final scene of Ibsen's 1879 ground-breaking masterwork, Nora Helmer makes the decision to leave her husband and children. This climactic event — when Nora slams the door on everything in her life — instantly propelled world drama into the modern age. In A Doll’s House, Part 2, many years have passed since Nora’s exit. Now, there’s a knock on that same door. Nora has returned. Golden Theater, 252 West 45th Street, through 23 July.

Julius Caesar – Shakespeare in the Park: The Public Theater’s Artistic Director Oskar Eustis directs Julius Caesar, Shakespeare’s play of politics and power, last seen in the Park 17 years ago. Rome’s leader, Julius Caesar, is a force unlike any the city has seen. Magnetic, populist, irreverent, he seems bent on absolute power. A small band of patriots, devoted to the country’s democratic traditions, must decide how to oppose him. Elizabeth Marvel, who played presidential characters in both “Homeland”and “House of Cards” is Marc Antony in a Pantsuit.  The Delacorte Theater in Central Park, 23 May through 18 June, see website for lottery.  

Brits off Broadway Festival: Now in its 13th year, Brits Off Broadway continues to be the highlight of the spring theater season, introducing bold new artists and new British theater to adventurous New York audiences. Rotterdam: Alice wants to come out as a lesbian. Her girlfriend Fiona wants to start living as a man. It's New Year in Rotterdam, and Alice has finally plucked up the courage to email her parents and tell them she's gay. But before she can hit send, Fiona reveals that he has always identified as a man and now wants to start living as one named Adrian.Now, as Adrian begins his transition, Alice must face a question she never thought she'd ask... does this mean she's straight? 59E59, 59 East 59th Street, through 17 May through 10 June, from $25.

The Cost of Living: Eddie, an unemployed truck driver, reunites with his ex-wife Ani after she suffers a devastating accident. John, a brilliant and witty doctoral student, hires over-worked Jess, a caregiver. As their lives intersect, Cost of Living delves into the chasm between abundance and need. City Center Stage 1, 131 West 55th Street, through 16 July, from $90.

The Government Inspector: When the crooked leadership of a provincial village discovers that an undercover inspector is coming to root out their commonplace corruption, the town weaves a web of bribery, lies, and utter madness. Michael Urie (Buyer & Cellar, Ugly Betty) leads the all-star cast including two-time Tony nominee Mary Testa, Arnie Burton (39 Steps, Irma Vep) and Stephen DeRosa (“Boardwalk Empire,” Into the Woods). The Duke on 42nd Street, 229 West 42nd Street, through 24 June, from $60.

DANCE

Whipped Cream: This inventive full-length premiere springs from the imagination of pop surrealist visionary, Mark Ryden. In it, a young boy overindulges at a Viennese pastry shop, and falls into a delirium. To help the boy escape from his attending physician, the boy dreams of his triumphant rescue by Princess Praline and her court, replete with Princess Tea Flower, Prince Prince Coffee as well as marching Marzipan, concluding in a festive celebration. American Ballet Theater, Metropolitan Opera House, Lincoln Center, 22-24 May, 26 June-1 July, from $22.

Seen together, the works in Carol Rama: Antibodies present a rare opportunity to examine the ways in which Rama’s fantastical anatomies opposed the political ideology of her time

Seen together, the works in Carol Rama: Antibodies present a rare opportunity to examine the ways in which Rama’s fantastical anatomies opposed the political ideology of her time

CANVAS

Carol Rama – Antibodies: The first New York museum survey of the work of Italian artist Carol Rama (b. 1918, Turin, Italy–d. 2015) in the US to date and brings together over 100 paintings highlighting her consistent fascination with the representation of the body. Seen together, these works present a rare opportunity to examine the ways in which Rama’s fantastical anatomies opposed the political ideology of her time and continue to speak to ideas of desire, repression, and liberation. New Museum, 235 Bowery, through 10 September, from $18.

Lonnie Holley: Holley began his artistic life in 1979 by carving tombstones for his sister's two children using blocks of a soft sandstone-like material discarded in piles by a foundry. He has sense developed of practice of making art with found objects, believing that divine intervention leads him to the material.Like parables, Holley’s sculptures are both inspiring and diagrammatic – each assemblage tells a story which seems to offer a way of living in the world. Fuentes, 55 Delancey Street, through 28 May.

Same Space Different Day – Shara Hughes: Utilizing an analogous organic silhouette as the compositional starting point for each canvas, Hughes explores the multitude of ways in which one object or idea may be perceived when expressed within different contexts. Playing with the boundaries between the real and the imagined, Hughes renders her paintings as portals into unique universes that beg for deeper discovery. Rachel Uffner Gallery, 170 Suffolk Street, through 25 June.

Robert Rauschenberg – Among Friends: The early 1950s, when Rauschenberg (1925–2008) launched his career, was the heyday of the heroic gestural painting of Abstract Expressionism. Rauschenberg challenged this tradition with an egalitarian approach to materials, bringing the stuff of the everyday world into his art. Robert Rauschenberg: Among Friends, the first 21st-century retrospective of the artist, presents work from six decades of his widely celebrated career in fresh ways, bringing together over 250 paintings, sculptures, drawings, prints, photographs, and sound and video recordings. Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), 11 West 53rd Street, through 17 September, $25.

Irving Penn Centennial: Long celebrated for more than six decades of influential work at Vogue magazine, Penn was first and foremost a fashion photographer. His early photographs of couture are masterpieces that established a new standard for photographic renderings of style at mid-century. Yet Penn's was also a peerless portraitist and blessed with an acute graphic intelligence and a sculptor's sensitivity to volumes in light, talents that served his superb nude studies and life-long explorations of still life. Met Museum, 1000 Fifth Ave., through 30 July, $25 suggested.

Carlo Zinelli (1916-1974): The first museum exhibition on this revered and distinctive Italian artist – a canonical art brut figure included in Jean Dubuffet’s collection from the 1960s – coincides with the one-hundredth anniversary of his birth. The show highlights four distinct phases in Zinelli’s oeuvre and new scholarship, through a selection of fifty-five paintings, audio recordings of Zinelli, a film, and images by Life magazine photographer John Phillips. American Folk Art Museum, 2 Lincoln Square, (Columbus Avenue between 65th and 66th Streets), through 20 August, Free.

Cindy Sherman – Once Upon a Time: Featuring more than two dozen works spanning thirty years, Once Upon a Time will take as its focus three of Sherman’s most acclaimed series: the Centerfolds, the History Portraits, and the Society Portraits. Mnuchin gallery, 45 east 78th Street, through 10 June, Free.

From anchorwoman to homeless man, in Manifesto, a chameleonic Cate Blanchett performs in 13 distinct, must-see vignettes that incorporate timeless manifestos from 20th century art movements.

From anchorwoman to homeless man, in Manifesto, a chameleonic Cate Blanchett performs in 13 distinct, must-see vignettes that incorporate timeless manifestos from 20th century art movements.

CINEMA

Buena Vista Socal Club, Adios: The musicians of the Buena Vista Social Club exposed the world to Cuba's vibrant culture with their landmark 1997 album. Now, against the backdrop of Cuba's captivating musical history, hear the band's story as they reflect on their remarkable careers and the extraordinary circumstances that brought them together. Lincoln Plaza Cinema, 1886 Broadway, Upper West Side, from $15.

Manifesto: From acclaimed visual artist Julian Rosefeldt, MANIFESTO features two-time Academy Award winner Cate Blanchett in 13 distinct, must-see vignettes that incorporate timeless manifestos from 20th century art movements. From anchorwoman to homeless man, from Pop Art to Dogma 95, a chameleonic Blanchett gives a tour-de-force performance as she transforms herself like never before. Film Forum, 209 W Houston Street, SoHo, from $15.

Wakefield: In this adaptation of E.L. Doctorow's short story, successful suburbanite commuter Howard Wakefield (Bryan Cranston) takes a perverse detour from family life: He vanishes without a trace. Hidden in the attic of his carriage house garage, surviving by scavenging at night, Howard secretly observes the lives of his wife and children and neighbors in a fraught meditation on marriage and identity. Landmark Sunshine Cinemas, 143 east Houston Street, Lower East Side, from $15.

Abacus – Small Enough to Jail: Accused of mortgage fraud by Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus R. Vance, Jr., Abacus becomes the only U.S. bank to face criminal charges in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis. The indictment and subsequent trial forces the Sung family to defend themselves – and their bank's legacy in the Chinatown community – over the course of a five-year legal battle. IFC Center, 323 6th Ave., West Village, from $15.

Cruel and Unusual: The story of three men who have spent longer in solitary confinement than any other prisoners in the US because of the murder of a prison guard in 1972 at Angola. Robert King, Herman Wallace and Albert Woodfox targeted as members of the Black Panther party and the film follows their struggle against the miscarriage of justice. Village East Cinemas, 181-, 189 2nd Ave, East Village, from $15.

Black Butterfly: Outside a mountain town, Paul (Antonio Banderas), a reclusive writer, struggles to start what he hopes will be a career-saving screenplay. After a tense encounter at a diner with a drifter named Jack (Jonathan Rhys Meyers), Paul offers Jack a place to stay. As a storm cuts off power to the isolated cabin, the two men begin a jagged game of one-upmanship that will bring at least one tale to an end. Cinema Village, 22 E 12th Street, East Village, from $15.

Hermia & Helena: Camila, a young Argentine theater director, travels from Buenos Aires to New York for an artist residency to work on a new Spanish translation of Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream. Upon her arrival, she quickly realizes that her work isn't compensating for the loss of her friends and the lover she left behind. When she begins to receive a series of mysterious postcards from Danièle, a former participant in the same residency, Camila second-guesses her artistic endeavors and begins to seek answers about her past. Film Society of Lincoln Center, 144 W. 65th Street, south side, Upper West Side, from $15.