5*Tcu (Tudor City Undercover) What's On: The Hong Kong Dragon Boat & Hart Island Edition

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what's on

The Hong Kong Dragon Boat & Hart Island Edition!

Greetings, 5tcu-ers!
 
It's still fairly quiet in the city, as everyone preps for big fall festivities. But if you look to the fringes, you will find some quality happenings. First up, Honey Soundsystem from San Franciso livens up Brooklyn nightlife, and the Hong Kong Dragon Boat Festival pushes human racing to the extreme. For the urban explorer, Exploring Roosevelt Island’s Ruins might be just right, or take a Trip to Hart Island with New York Adventure Club and see NYC's latest fascination with years past -- besides the subway tunnels, of course. DJ Bonobo is at Brooklyn Steel on 23 August, an electronica composer not to be missed! And if drinking and theater is your thing, don't miss The Imbible – A Spirited History of DrinkingMuch more listed below!

Count on the bird's eye view from this surprising Midtown neighborhood to help keep you up to date on all the worthwhile things happening in the city.

Tudor City Undercover: the original Williamsburg. 
 

What’s On: 5tcu resides on www.the5tcu.com, or  www.blindfolio.com/5tcu
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The 54-room Carlton Arms Hotel, which has become a vibrant permanent exhibition of art with every inch of space covered by the incredible colorful works of artists from around the world.

The 54-room Carlton Arms Hotel, which has become a vibrant permanent exhibition of art with every inch of space covered by the incredible colorful works of artists from around the world.

BOOK/LECTURE/FESTIVAL

Honey Soundsystem: Inspired by the gay underground party scene and the history of dance music, this San Francisco collective thrives on sweaty, all night grooves. Expect the four-person crew to deliver their signature blend of house, classic and disco tracks. Good Room, 98 Meserole Ave., Greenpoint, 11 August, 10pm, from $15.  

Hong Kong Dragon Boat Festival: This is an annual sporting and multicultural event to celebrate the fifth moon of the lunar calendar. In addition to providing audiences with traditional Chinese foods and performances, the festival hosts over 120 dragon boat teams from across North America, making it one of the largest dragon boat festivals in the United States. Meadow Lake in Flushing Meadows Corona Park, Queens, 12-13 August, Free.

Exploring Roosevelt Island’s Ruins: Join New York Adventure Club and explore Roosevelt Island, which has been home to Dutch farms, rehabilitation institutions, asylums, hospitals, scientific laboratories, and more. Roosevelt Island Tramway (In Front of Plaza Statue), E. 59th Street, 12 August, 10am, from $29.

Unlocking Gilded Age Mausoleums @ Woodlawn Cemetery: Step inside some of the country’s most opulent family mausoleums that are rarely unlocked for the public. Join New York Adventure Club for an exclusive, behind-the-scenes experience at Woodlawn Cemetery, covering more than 400 acres and serving as the resting place for more than 300,000 people. Woodlawn Cemetery (Jerome Ave Entrance), 501 Jerome Avenue, Bronx, 12 August, 3pm, from $29.

First Look @ Carlton Arms Hotel: Join New York Adventure Club for an exclusive, behind-the-scenes tour of the 54-room Carlton Arms Hotel, which has become a vibrant permanent exhibition of art with every inch of space covered by the incredible colorful works of artists from around the world. Carlton Arms Hotel, 160 East 25th Street, 16 August, 6pm, from $25.  

Live from Home – Iron & Wine: An intimate benefit concert with Iron & Wine in the unique comfort of the historic bookstore. Tickets are a nonrefundable donation to Housing Works’ lifesaving services for people living with HIV/AIDS and its political advocacy work to end AIDS as an epidemic in New York by 2020. Housing Works Café, 126 Crosby Street, 16 August, 8pm, $35.  

Maria Bamford with Jackie Kashian: Maria Bamford stars in the semi-autobiographical Netflix comedy series Lady Dynamite, one of 2016’s must-see shows by Variety and Rolling Stone. She was the first female comic to have two half-hour Comedy Central Presents specials and starred alongside Patton Oswalt, Zach Galifianakis and Brian Posehn in the Comedy Central series The Comedians of Comedy. The Bell House, 149 7th Street, Brooklyn, 16-17 August, $30.

Trip to Hart Island with New York Adventure Club: Join New York Adventure Club for a rare visit to Hart Island, which has been used as a Union Civil War prison camp, psychiatric institution, tuberculosis sanatorium, boys’ reformatory, and potter’s field. The Department of Correction is responsible for operating and maintaining Hart Island and based on burial records, as many as one million people have been interred there. Department of Correction Pier, 299 Fordham Street, Bronx, 17 August, 8:45am, $40 refundable deposit.

HBO Bryant Park Summer Film Festival: Spend your Mondays sprawled out on the lawn at Bryant Park this summer, with a movie playing just as the sun goes down. You can count on seeing live performances and Warner Bros. cartoons before the start of every screening. Bryant Park, 42nd and 6th Avenue, Free.

North by Northwest; 14 August

Dirty Dancing: 21 August

Rooftop Cinema Club: Movies go down better with cocktails. And the whole experience is even sweeter when you can take in a Manhattan or Brooklyn sunset. Rooftop Cinema has perfected the night out at the movies.

Ferris Bueller's Day Off: 10 August, 8:15pm, OfficeOps (Brooklyn)

Donnie Darko 4k Restoration 15th anniversary edition: 14 August, 8pm, OfficeOps (Brooklyn)

See Bonobo at Brooklyn Steel on 23 August.

See Bonobo at Brooklyn Steel on 23 August.

CONCERT

RJD2: 11 August, Brooklyn Steel

Four Tet: 18 August, Analog BKNY, Brooklyn

Mulatu Astatke / Emel Mathlouthi / DJ Sirak: 20 August, Central Park SummerStage, Free

Midnight Oil: 21 August, Terminal 5

Bonobo: 23 August, Brooklyn Steel

Filthy Friends (David Bowie Cover Band from REM, Sleater-Kinney): 29 August, Bell House

Songkick, Ticketfly or Bowery Presents

The New York Liberty are back playing at Madison Square Garden.

The New York Liberty are back playing at Madison Square Garden.

SPORT

New York Liberty:

v. Los Angeles Sparks, Madison Square Garden, 13 August, 3pm, from $15

v. Minnesota Lynx, Madison Square Garden, 20 August, 3pm, from $15

v. Washington Mystics, Madison Square Garden, 25 August, 7:30pm, from $15

v. Chicago Sky, Madison Square Garden, 27 August, 3pm, from $15

v. San Antonio Stars, Madison Square Garden, 1 September, 7:30pm, from $15

New York Mets

v. Texas Rangers, 8-9 August, 7pm, 12pm

v. Yankees, 16-17 August, 7pm

v. Florida Marlins, 18-20 August, 7pm, 1pm

v. Arizona Diamondbacks, 21-24 August, 7pm, 12pm

New York City Football Club

v. New England Revolution, 20 August, 6pm

Enjoy a play with your cocktail. The Imbible makes the story of our relationship with alcohol remarkably compelling. And the show's lessons – on subjects like the origin of the gin and tonic are remarkably accurate!

Enjoy a play with your cocktail. The Imbible makes the story of our relationship with alcohol remarkably compelling. And the show's lessons – on subjects like the origin of the gin and tonic are remarkably accurate!

THEATRE

The Imbible – A Spirited History of Drinking: Mixing whimsy and information, The Imbible makes the story of our relationship with alcohol remarkably compelling. And the show's lessons – on subjects like the drinks served at Prohibition-era speakeasies, the origin of the gin and tonic, and the difference between a cocktail and a mixed drink – can be washed down with complimentary, thematically appropriate beverages. New World Stages, 340 W 50th Street, through 30 December, from $39.  

Anastasia: In 1927 Leningrad, the scrappy, strapping Dmitry and the worldly, roguish Vlad devise a scheme to pass off a street sweeper, Anya, as the Grand Duchess Anastasia Nicholaevna Romanov, rumored to have survived the massacre of the rest of her royal family in the Russian Revolution 10 years earlier. But as the con men school her in the ways of nobility – hoping to deceive Anastasia’s grandmother in Paris, the Dowager Empress – it emerges that Anya may be the real Anastasia after all. Broadhurst Theatre, 235 W 44th Street, through 7 January, from $69

The Unwritten Law: World Famous beatboxer Chesney Snow presents his journey from a legacy of incarceration to fatherhood, homelessness to Harvard University, to ultimately starring in the Broadway musical In TransitThe Unwritten Law adeptly weaves this inspiring story with words, dance, visual design and live music. Dixon Place, 61A Chrystie Street, (btwn. Delancey & Rivington), 13-14 August, $22.

Heartless Bastard: Barry Weiss is a hot shot broker, but when he needs a new heart, he descends into a comically callous world where everything feels wrong and he is deeply disturbed. What are these feelings, these thoughts, all these questions? When he shows up on the doorstep of the dead man’s widow, he begins a dangerous journey into the deeper meaning of his transplant. HERE, 145 Sixth Ave. (one block south of Spring), through 2 September, from $18.  

The Rise and Fall (and Rise) of Martha Stewart: This musical by Ryan Raftery (creator of the Anna Wintour and Andy Cohen musicals) tells the fascinating story of the woman who changed the way we live by daring us to try harder. From her humble beginnings in Nutley to her empire-building years in Westport, to her highly-publicized stint in federal prison, this is a chronicle of epically blind ambition set to the music of artists as varied as Beyonce to Metallica. Joe’s Pub, 425 Lafayette Street, 7, 22, 28 August, 11-12 September, $35.

The Terms of My Surrender: Michael Moore brings his powers of provocation and satire to the stage for the first time in The Terms of My Surrender, a one-man play directed by Tony winner Michael Mayer. A theatrical coup d’etat that takes the utter lunacy of our times and turns it into a subversive piece of theatre. Belasco Theatre, 111 West 44th Street, through 22 October, from $29.  

The Suitcase Under the Bed: So named for the place where all of Teresa Deevy’s writing was stored for decades, The Suitcase Under the Bed features four short plays casting an unsentimental eye on the idea of marriage. Teresa Deevy, called one of Ireland’s most neglected playwrights, had six plays produced by the Abbey Theatre between 1930 and 1936, before she began to write for the radio – a remarkable turn of events, given that she was completely deaf. The Beckett Theatre at Theatre Row, 410 West 42nd St, through 23 September, from $65.  

Summer Shorts: Summer Shorts is an annual event where audiences can get reacquainted with some of their favorite American playwrights, and discover new talent. This year’s festival features new one-act plays from Chris Cragin-Day, Lindsey Kraft & Andrew Leeds, Neil LaBute, Academy Award-winner, Graham Moore in his playwrighting debut and multiple Emmy Award-winner Alan Zweibel. 9E59, 59 East 59th Street, through 2 September, from $25.

Get hip to the groove, cat, and check out The Jazz Age, a multi-media experience of more than 400 examples of interior design, industrial design, decorative art and architecture at Cooper Hewitt

Get hip to the groove, cat, and check out The Jazz Age, a multi-media experience of more than 400 examples of interior design, industrial design, decorative art and architecture at Cooper Hewitt

CANVAS

The Jim Hensen Exhibit: For those of us who learned comedy, whimsy and even literacy from Sesame Street and the Muppet franchise, Museum of Moving Image has provided the ultimate treat: a permanent exhibition featuring over 47 Muppet and puppet characters; 27 screens of archival footage; and stories of some of our favorite characters. Museum of the Moving Image, 36-01 35th Ave., Queens, $15, reserve tickets.

The Jazz Age – American Style in the 1920s: The first major museum exhibition to focus on American taste during the creative explosion of the 1920s, The Jazz Age is a multi-media experience of more than 400 examples of interior design, industrial design, decorative art and architecture. Cooper Hewitt Museum, 2 East 91st Street, (between 5th and Madison Avenues), through 20 August, $16.

Chihuly: Step into the sublimely colorful mind of multimedia artist Dale Chihuly at this larger-than-life exhibition, where more than 20 of the celebrated creator’s gigantic pieces take over the gardens. New York Botanical Garden, 2900 Southern Blvd., the Bronx, through 29 October, $23.  

Magnum Manifesto: A look back at Magnum Photos and the agency’s 70-year influence in the photography industry. Magnum, created by Robert Capa, Henri Cartier-Bresson, George Rodger and Chim (David Seymour) in 1947, will explore the history of the second half of the 20th century through the lens of 75 master photographers. International Center for Photography, 250 Bowery, through 3 September, $14.

Talking Pictures: This exhibition explores what happens when artists are partnered with other artists and the pairs engage in a visual dialogue using only their phones. The Met commissioned 12 artists to participate in the project – highlights include a comical back-and-forth of videos between William Wegman and Tony Oursler; an exchange of photographs of paintings created by Cynthia Daignault and Daniel Heidkamp; a witty dialogue about feminism and political resistance between Nicole Eisenman and A. L. Steiner; and creations between artists Christoph Niemann and Nicholas Blechman. The Met Museum of Art, Fifth Ave., through 17 December, $25 suggested.  

Bronx Calling – the 4th AIM Biennial: Now in its fourth cycle, Bronx Calling: The Fourth AIM Biennial features the work of seventy-two emerging artists from the 2016 and 2017 classes of the Bronx Museum’s Artist in the Marketplace (AIM) program. AIM provides professional development resources to emerging artists living and working in the New York metropolitan area. Bronx Museum of the Arts, 1040 Grand Concourse, Bronx, through 22 October, Free. 

Flow.17 – Island of Empirical Data: This interactive art piece uses historical records, statistical data, photo archives, and government documents to explore the complexity and reflexivity of culturally-constructed histories. Oversized, colorful, reflective panels, covered with photographs of buildings, sites and landmarks, draw attention to the Island’s history as microcosm of urban planning and cultural transformation. By Rose DeSiano, an alumna of the Bronx Museum's (AIM) program. Randall’s Island, touchdown of the 103rd Street Footbridge from Manhattan, through October 2017.

Richard Gerstl: An extremely original artist whose psychologically intense figure paintings and landscapes constitute a radically unorthodox oeuvre, the longstanding secrecy surrounding Gerstl’s suicide at the age of 25, only further magnify the legend that has grown around this lesser known member of Vienna’s artistic avant-garde. This is the first museum retrospective in the United States devoted to the work of the Austrian Expressionist. Neue Galerie, 1048 Fifth Avenue (at 86th Street), through 25 September, $20.

Weeks before the 2011 Egyptian revolution, Noredin, a police officer in Cairo's corrupt system, investigates the murder of a famous club singer in the Nile Hilton Incident. But it's bigger than he realizes.

Weeks before the 2011 Egyptian revolution, Noredin, a police officer in Cairo's corrupt system, investigates the murder of a famous club singer in the Nile Hilton Incident. But it's bigger than he realizes.

CINEMA

The Trip to Spain: After jaunts through northern England and Italy, Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon embark on another deliciously deadpan culinary road trip: Spain. Over plates of pintxos and paella, the pair exchange barbs and their patented celebrity impressions, as well as more serious reflections on what it means to settle into middle age. Lincoln Plaza Cinema, 1886 Broadway, Upper West Side, from $15. 

Nocturama: A terrorism thriller like no other, Nocturama follows a group of tense, shifty adolescents as they prowl the streets of Paris, learning through carefully delineated sequences that they're already well underway with a bombing plot. Will they survive the unseen, encroaching authorities? Or, as the walls close in, will they even survive each other? Film Society of Lincoln Center, 165 W. 65th Street, Upper East Side, from $20.

4 Days in in France (Jours de France): On a seemingly ordinary night in Paris, Pierre takes one last look his lover Paul’s sleeping body, then takes off into the early morning light. Where he’s headed, neither of them know. Pierre’s only guide is his Grindr app, which leads him on a series of encounters with an indelible cast of characters across the French countryside. Paul sets out after him, using his own phone to track Pierre's movements in a strange and wonderful game of Grindr cat-and-mouse. Quad Cinema, 34 W 13th Street, East Village, from $15.   

The Nile Hilton Incident: Weeks before the 2011 Egyptian revolution, Noredin, a police officer in Cairo's corrupt system, investigates the murder of a famous club singer at the Nile Hilton Hotel. What initially seems to be a crime of passion turns into something that concerns the very power elite of Egypt. Lincoln Plaza Cinema, 1886 Broadway, Upper West Side, from $15.

Whose Streets?: An unflinching look at the Ferguson uprising. Whose Streets? tells the story of unarmed teenager Michael Brown killed by police and left lying in the street for hours and the long-standing racial tensions and renewed anger bring forth. Landmark Sunshine, 143 E Houston Street, Lower East Side, from $15.

Machines: Director Rahul Jain presents an intimate portrayal of the rhythm of life and work in a gigantic textile factory in Gujarat, India. Moving through the corridors and bowels of the disorientating structure, the camera takes the viewer on a journey to a place of dehumanising physical labor and intense hardship, provoking thought about the huge divide between first world and developing countries. Film Forum, 209 W Houston Street, West Village, from $15.

Step: Step documents the senior year of a girls’ high-school step dance team against the background of inner-city Baltimore. As each one tries to attend college, the girls strive to make their dancing a success against the backdrop of social unrest in the troubled city. Lincoln Plaza Cinema, 1886 Broadway, Upper West Side, from $15. 

Landline: Set in 1990s Manhattan, when two sisters suspect their father (John Turturro) may be having an affair, older sister Dana (Jenny Slate), engaged and struggling with her own fidelity, finds herself bonding with her wild teenage sister Ali (Abby Quinn). The two try to uncover the truth without tipping off their mother (Edie Falco) and discover the messy reality of love and sex in the process. Cinema Village, 22 E 12th Street, E. Village, from $15.  

Columbus: When a renowned architecture scholar falls suddenly ill during a speaking tour, his son Jin finds himself stranded in Columbus, Indiana – a small Midwestern city celebrated for its many significant modernist buildings. Jin strikes up a friendship with Casey, a young architecture enthusiast. As their intimacy develops, Jin and Casey explore both the town and their conflicted emotions. IFC Center, 323 6th Ave., W. Village, from $15.