5*Tcu (*Tudor City Undercover): The South Africa Edition

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The South Africa Edition!

Greetings, 5tcu-ers!

It’s time for a holiday. To a place where “a fool is a wise man’s ladder” or “by pounding the bread, the dough rises” and so on and so on. Yes, headed to South Africa, where The Big Five marathon awaits, as well as the hope that the lions aren’t hungry. I won’t return to 5*Tcu until at least 13 July, or perhaps indefinitely, as this is a time-costly enterprise and labor of love at the moment, and my time = my income. If you like and use the 5*Tcu, drop me a line, or follow me on Instagram and say so. If you don’t use it or enjoy it, no worries and no offense. What started as a list of things to do among friends has grown to nearly 300 people and I have been lucky to see that sort of popularity.

Now for the things while I am away. In addition to movies, baseball games and concerts that will take you to mid-July, check out the Trump Pop-Up Presidential Library of Tweets starting tomorrow, put together by South African comedian and host of the Daily Show, Trevor Noah. Admission is free, but lines may be long at the West 57th Street exhibition, said to be visible from “a certain tower.” Also, on a more serious note, AIDS devastated a generation – here and in South Africa – but it also became the focus of relentless, resilient writing and work that has gone on to inspire countless other advocates. Join PEN America on 22 June to hear from poets storytellers, and performers to mark an historic occasion of unveiling of the AIDS Memorial, located in a public park adjacent to the former St. Vincent’s Hospital. It honors the more than 100,000 individuals lost to AIDS in NYC alone. Don’t forget the Mermaid Parade on Saturday in Coney Island, and if you have a chance, stop by Joe’s Pub on 19 June to see friend and Transparent writer Faith Soloway & Friends present Transparent, the Musical!
 
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See Trevor Noah talk about his book, Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood at Symphony Space, 95th and Broadway, 13 July

See Trevor Noah talk about his book, Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood at Symphony Space, 95th and Broadway, 13 July

BOOK/LECTURE/FESTIVAL

Mermaid Parade: A celebration of ancient mythology and “honky-tonk rituals of the seaside”, the Mermaid Parade showcases more than 3,000 creative individuals from the five boroughs and beyond, opening the summer with incredible art and community pride. This year’s parade features Parade Royalty Deborah Harry and Chris Stein of Blondie. Coney Island, West 21st Street and Surf Avenue, 17 June, 1pm, Free.

Exploring the 1656 Lent-Riker House & Grounds, Oldest Private Home in U.S.: Not many people can say they live in the oldest house in America — except one New Yorker, Marion Duckworth Smith in East Elmhurst, Queens. Join New York Adventure Club on private tour of the 1656 Lent-Riker-Smith Homestead, the oldest private dwelling in New York City, and arguably the United States. Lent-Riker-Smith Homestead (1656)s, 78-03 19th Road, Queens, 17 June, 2pm, from $25.

Underground Manhattan, The Secret History of the Subway System: Join New York Adventure Club and explore the oldest subway stations in New York City with transit expert and guide Garry Dennis. Starting at Brooklyn Bridge Station and working up to Grand Central Terminal, Gary will give you the secret history and inside story of the creation of the original 1904 subway line, and how it grew into the most extensive transportation system in the world. Municipal Building (Right Side of Colonnade, Top of Stairs to Subway), 1 Centre Street, 18 June, 2pm, from $29.

River to River Festival: A multimedia opera about Robert Moses and Jane Jacobs; an expansive artwork about the African diaspora; and a site-specific music and dance spectacle about the United States’ immigrant history are among the more than 100 events planned for this year’s River to River Festival. In the festival’s final days, En Garde Arts’s “Harbored” will incorporate more than 50 artists from the worlds of dance, theater and music for a performance collage about the history of immigration in the United States. Various venues, 14-25 June, Free.

Rooftop Cinema Club: Featuring cult, classic, and recent releases, Rooftop Cinema Club hosts the ultimate after-work hangout at two rad outposts—one at the swanky Yotel near Times Square, and the other at Brooklyn’s OfficeOps. At Yotel, your ticket hooks you up with a pair of wireless headphones to control your preferred volume, a yummy bag of buttered popcorn, and a glass of bubbles. At OfficeOps, there’s a BYO policy as far as food and drinks go, so bring along your favorite bites and beverages.

Raiders of the Lost Ark, 19 June, 8:30pm OfficeOps, 57 Thames Street, Williamsburg, from $17

Split, 22 June, 9:30pm, Yotel, 570 Tenth Ave, Midtown, from $33

North by Northwest, 23 June, 8:30pm OfficeOps, 57 Thames Street, Williamsburg, from $17

SpiceWorld (20th Anniversary), 23 June, 9:30pm, Yotel, 570 Tenth Ave, Midtown, from $33

Grease, 25 June, 9:30pm, Yotel, 570 Tenth Ave, Midtown, from $33

Brokeback Mountain: 5 July, Yotel, 570 10th Avenue, from $33

Annie Hall: 15 July, Yotel, 570 10th Avenue, from $33

Clueless: 18 July, Yotel, 570 10th Avenue, from $33 

Sketching Salon: 1920s Harlem Renaissance & Jazz Age Speakeasy: Draw, sip, and sketch while soaking in the 1920s “speakeasy” style during this one-of-a-kind after-hours art program. This inaugural salon will feature costumed models, live jazz music, and interactive exhibition tours – all while you drink and draw! Museum of the City of New York, 1220 Fifth Ave. (at 103rd Street) 15 June, 6:30pm, $50, all attendees will receive a Copic Marker sketchbook and pen.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren at Town Hall: The fiery U.S. Senator from Massachusetts and bestselling author presents her new book, This Fight Is Our Fight, her eleventh. It offers a passionate tome about why our middle class is under siege and how we can win the fight to save it. Town Hall, 23 West 43rd Street (between 6th Ave and Broadway), 16 June, 5pm, from $45, all tickets include signed book.

Faith Soloway & Friends – Should Transparent Become A Musical?: Come to this cabaret symposium and shape destiny with Transparent writer Faith Soloway. She’ll preview (for the first time) songs that you’ll hear on the big stage if/when award -winning series Transparent becomes a musical! Jackie Hoffman and other special guests will join Faith on stage. Joe’s Pub, 425 Lafayette Street, 19 June, 7pm. $20.

HBO Bryant Park Summer Film Festival: Spend your Mondays sprawled out on the lawn at Bryant Park this summer, with a movie playing just as the sun goes down. You can count on seeing live performances and Warner Bros. cartoons before the start of every screening. Bryant Park, 42nd and 6th Avenue, Free.

King Kong, 19 June

The Muppets Take Manhattan, 3 July 

Arundhati Roy presents The Ministry of Utmost Happiness: The Booker Prize-winning author of The God of Small Things comes to BAM for the launch of her first novel in 20 years The Ministry of Utmost Happiness. Arundhati's novel takes us on an intimate journey of many years across the Indian subcontinent – from the cramped neighborhoods of Old Delhi and the roads of the new city to the mountains and valleys of Kashmir and beyond, where war is peace and peace is war. Unbound Series at BAM, Peter Jay Sharp Opera House, 30 Lafayette Avenue, Brooklyn, 19 June, 7:30pm, $25 for event, $35 with book. 

The Moth Story Slam with Dan Kennedy (Outnumbered)Ten stories, three teams of judges, one winner. Host Dan Kennedy is a regular contributor to McSweeny's, and author of the books Loser Goes First: My Thirty Something Years of Dumb Luck and Minor Humiliation, and Rock On: An Office Power-Ballad. All NYC StorySlam tickets (Premium and General Admission) are available online one week before the show at 3pm. HousingWorks Bookstore Café, 126 Crosby Street, 19 June, 7pm, $8, themoth.org/events.

Lee Friedlander with Giancarlo T. Roma – Passion Projects: Speaking in public for the first time in over three decades, the pioneering photographer Lee Friedlander will take to the LIVE stage in conversation with his grandson Giancarlo T. Roma. Friedlander is perhaps best known for his portraits of the social landscape, which have penetrated to the heart of American life for half a century. In the 1970s, he established a self-publishing company called Haywire Press and 30 years later, together with Roma, he has revived it, offering books, special editions, and portfolios pulled directly from his collection. New York Public Library, 42nd and Fifth Ave., 20 June, 7pm, $40.

Book Launch – Extraordinary Adventures by Daniel Wallace: When Edsel Bronfman gets a call from Carla D’Angelo, operator 61217 at Extraordinary Adventures, alerting him to the fact he’s won a free weekend at a beachfront condo in Destin, Florida, he is flabbergasted. But, there are conditions: the offer is intended for a couple, and it expires in 79 days. The phone call jolts Edsel into motion, initiating a series of truly extraordinary adventures as he sets out to find a companion for his weekend getaway. Daniel Wallace talks about his book with Pulitzer Price winning author Elizabeth Strout. Powerhouse@the Archway, 28 Adams Street (Corner of Adams & Water Street), DUMBO, 21 June, 7pm, rsvp@powerhousearena.com.

The Moth Mainstage: The Moth has presented thousands of stories told live and without notes. The New-York Historical Society welcomes THE MOTH to its auditorium for this event. New-York Historical Society, 170 Central Park West at (77th St), 22 June, 7pm, from $35.  

Ask Me Another: A rambunctious hour that blends brainteasers and local pub trivia night with comedy and music, host Ophira Eisenberg invites in-studio guests and listeners alike to stretch their noggins and enjoy witty banter and guitar riffs from house musician Jonathan Coulton. Ask Me Another is a co-production of NPR and WNYC. The Bell House, 149 7th Street, Brooklyn, 26 June, 7:30pm, from $20.

Book Launch: The Windfall by Diksha Basu: For the past thirty years, Mr. and Mrs. Jha’s lives have been defined by cramped spaces, cut corners, gossipy neighbors, and the small dramas of stolen yoga pants and stale marriages. But then Mr. Jha comes into an enormous and unexpected sum of money, and moves his wife from their housing complex in East Delhi to the super-rich side of town, which brings unintended consequences, ultimately forcing the Jha family to reckon with what really matters.Powerhouse@the Archway, 28 Adams Street (Corner of Adams & Water Street), DUMBO, 29 June, 7pm, rsvp@powerhousearena.com.

Exploring Red Hook, From Aging Industrial Architecture to Artist Magnet: Join New York Adventure Club and explore Brooklyn’s waterfront neighborhood of Red Hook; seemingly ignored and neglected due to its isolation (Red Hook has seen a resurgence as a site for opportunity and inspiration. Led by licensed tour guide Norman Oder, our unique neighborhood is an overview of Red Hook and its evolution from a small Dutch village, to gritty waterfront district, to New York’s next “destination neighborhood.” Northeast corner of Seabring and Van Brunt Sts (Near Friends of Firefighters), Seabring and Van Brunt, Brooklyn, 1 July, 2pm, from $25.

The Moth Story Slam with Peter Aguero: Ten stories, three teams of judges, one winner. Host Peter Aguero is a Moth StorySLAM host, GrandSLAM champion, and instructor for the MothSHOP Community Education Program. All NYC StorySlam tickets are available online one week before the show at 3pm. The Bell House, 149 7th Street, Brooklyn, 6 July, 8pm, themoth.org/events.  

Ask Me Another: A rambunctious hour that blends brainteasers and local pub trivia night with comedy and music, host Ophira Eisenberg invites in-studio guests and listeners alike to stretch their noggins and enjoy witty banter and guitar riffs from house musician Jonathan Coulton. Ask Me Another is a co-production of NPR and WNYC. The Bell House, 149 7th Street, Brooklyn, 10 July, 7:30pm, from $20. 

Intrepid Museum’s Summer Movie Series: Here’s a uniquely New York experience: watch a movie on the deck of an aircraft carrier used in World War II. You can expect awesome views of NYC’s skyline and the Hudson River, all while taking in a film. Arrive early, since space is limited. Intrepid Museum, 46th Street, West Side Highway, Free.

Good Morning, Vietnam, 11 July

Literary Death Match: Each episode of this competitive, humor-centric reading series features a thrilling mix of four famous and emerging authors who perform their most electric writing in seven minutes before a panel of three all-star judges. After each pair of readings, the judges take turns selecting their favorite to advance to the finals. The Bell House, 149 7th Street, Brooklyn, 12 July, 8pm, from $15.

Joshua Cohen launches Moving Kings: The year is 2015, and 21-year-olds Yoav and Uri, who have just completed their compulsory military service in the Israel Defense Forces, take a year off. They come to New York City and begin working for Yoav's distant cousin, David King, as eviction-movers. What starts off as a profitable if eerily familiar job, turns violent when one homeowner seeks revenge. Community Bookstore, 143 7th Ave, Brooklyn, 13 July, 6:30pm, Free.

Trevor Noah – Born a Crime: Trevor Noah has taken the world by storm with his incendiary wit and politically charged satire, stemming from his comedy career in South Africa. After becoming the successor of The Daily Show in 2015, he chronicled tales of his life growing up in South Africa during the death throes of apartheid and the ensuing aftermath in his biography. See him talk about his book, Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood. Symphony Space, 95th and Broadway, 13 July, 8:30pm, $40, includes a copy of the book.

See Elvis Costello at Central Park SummerStage on 15 June.

See Elvis Costello at Central Park SummerStage on 15 June.

CONCERT

The Shins: 15 June, Celebrate Brooklyn, Prospect Park Bandshell

Elvis Costello & The Imposters: 15 June, SummerStage, Central Park

Daryl Hall & John Oates and Tears for Fears: 16 June, Forest Hills Stadium

Sigur Rós: 17 June, Forest Hills Stadium

Conor Oberst: 20 June, Celebrate Brooklyn, Prospect Park Bandshell

Diana Krall: 21 June, Beacon Theatre

Siversun Pickups: 24 June, Jones Beach

Teagan and Sara: 24 June, NYC Pride

Aimee Mann: 26 June, Music Hall of Williamsburg

U2: 29 June, MetLife Stadium, East Rutherford, NJ

Guster: 6 July, Forest Hills Stadium

My Morning Jacket: 15 July, Forest Hills Stadium

PJ Harvey: 19 July, Central Park SummerStage

Mashrou Leila: 18 July, Le Poisson Rouge

Sufjan Stevens: 18 July BRIC Celebrate Brooklyn, Prospect Park Bandshell

Songkick, Ticketfly or Bowery Presents

SPORT

Gotham Girls Roller Derby

Doubleheader, Brooklyn Bombshells v. Queens of Pain; Manhattan Mayhem v. Bronx Gridlock, 15 July, Abe Stark Rink, Coney Island, 4pm, from $20

New York Liberty:

v. Connecticut Sun, Madison Square Garden, 23 June, 7:30pm, from $15

v. Chicago Sky, Madison Square Garden, 14 July, 7:30pm, from $15

New York City Football Club

v. Seattle Sounders, 17 June, 1pm

v. Minnesota United, 29 June, 7:30pm

v. Toronto Football Club, 19 July, 7:30pm

v. Chicago Fire, 22 July, 2pm

New York Mets

v. Washington Nationals, 15-18 June, 7pm, 4pm, 1pm

v. Philadelphia Phillies, 30 June-2 July, 4pm, 4pm, 1pm

v. Colorado Rockies, 14-16 July, 7pm, 1pm

v. St. Louis Cardinals, 17-20 July, 7pm, 12pm

v. Oakland Athletics, 21-23 July, 7pm, 1pm

With songs like “This Land is Your Land” and “So Long It’s Been Good To Know Yuh” a talented group of four actor/musicians bring to life the many people who formed the fabric of Woody Guthrie's story in Woody Sez.

With songs like “This Land is Your Land” and “So Long It’s Been Good To Know Yuh” a talented group of four actor/musicians bring to life the many people who formed the fabric of Woody Guthrie's story in Woody Sez.

THEATRE

Hamlet: Oscar Isaac (Star Wars: The Force Awakens, Romeo and Juliet) returns to The Public in this electrifyingly intimate new production of Shakespeare’s eternal drama. Tony Award winner Sam Gold (Fun Home, Othello) directs theater’s most powerful tragedy about life and death, madness and conscience, and corruption – of the state and of the soul. Anspacher Theater, The Public Theater, 425 Lafayette Street, 20 June through 3 September, $75.

Woody Sez – The Life & Music of Woody Guthrie: Woody Sez is a joyous musical portrait, rich with the words and songs of America’s great troubadour, which transports the audience through the fascinating, beautiful, and sometimes tragic life of Woody Guthrie. With songs like “This Land is Your Land” and “So Long It’s Been Good To Know Yuh” a talented group of four actor/musicians bring to life the many people who formed the fabric of his story. Irish Reperatory Theatre, 132 West 22md Street, through 23 July, from $50.  

Pipeline: Nya, an inner-city public high school teacher, is committed to her students, but desperate to give her only son Omari opportunities they’ll never have. When a controversial incident at his upstate private school threatens to get him expelled, Nya must confront his rage and her own choices as a parent. Lincoln City Theater, 150 West 65th Street, through 27 August, from $77.

Measure for Measure: Simon Godwin, Associate Director, London’s National Theatre, stages Measure for Measure, William Shakespeare’s dark comedy about justice, faith, power, sex, and family. Jonathan Cake, Cara Ricketts and Thomas Jay Ryan lead a company of 12 actors in a high-stakes conflict of clashing ideologies – a diverse world in which incompatible values collide. Theatre for a New Audience, 262 Ashland Place, Brooklyn, through 16 July, from $85.

A Hunger Artist: What begins as a nostalgic celebration of a lost art form – and its most famous practitioner – becomes a darkly funny trip into the very question of what it means to suffer, and when suffering becomes a public spectacle. In this adaptation of Kafka's tragicomic story “A Hunger Artist”, Sinking Ship co-artistic director Jonathan Levin gives a playful performance as the only person who remembers an artist whose act was simply… to hunger. Connelly Theater, 220 East 4th Street, through 27 June, from $15.

The Traveling Lady: Penned by the beloved playwright and master storyteller Horton Foote, The Traveling Lady is the tale of an intrepid woman who journeys to a small town in 1950's Texas to reunite with her husband upon his release from prison. A poignant story of loss and redemption. Cherry Lane, 38 Commerce Street, through 16 July, from $65. 

Marvin’s Room: Lee is a single mother who's been busy raising her troubled teenage son, Hank. Her estranged sister Bessie has her hands full with their elderly father, his soap opera-obsessed sister—and a brand-new life-or-death diagnosis. Now the women are about to reunite for the first time in 18 years. Can these almost-strangers become a family? American Airlines Theater, 227 West 42nd Street, through 27 August, from $47.

Napoli, Brooklyn: In 1960 Brooklyn, the Muscolinos have raised three proud and passionate daughters. But as the girls come of age in a rapidly changing world, their paths diverge. When an earth-shattering event rocks their Park Slope neighborhood, life comes to a screeching halt and the Muscolino sisters are forced to confront their conflicting visions. The Laura Pels Theatre, 111 West 46th Street, through 3 September, from $79.

Brits off Broadway Festival: Now in its 13th year, Brits Off Broadway continues to be the highlight of the spring theater season, introducing bold new artists and new British theater to adventurous New York audiences.

Underground: After matching on a dating app, Claire and James meet for an awkward first date. On their way home together, the brand new Night Tube breaks down. Forced to get to know each other a little better, things start to get weird. 59E59, 59 East 59th Street, 14 June through 2 July, from $25.

Invincible: Emily and Oliver have decided to downsize and shift their middle- class London lifestyle to a small town in the north of England. One night they open their doors and invite next door neighbours, Dawn and Alan into their home. Over the course of a disastrous evening of olives, anchovies, Karl Marx and abstract art; class and culture collide where the consequences are as tragic as they are hilarious. 59E59, 59 East 59th Street, 1 June through 2 July, from $25.

OPERA

Angels in America: New York City Opera closes its season with the New York Premiere of Péter Eötvös’s Angels in America based on the play by Tony Kushner. This operatic adaptation of the groundbreaking, Pulitzer Prize-winning play distills the two-night, seven-hour drama into a single, powerful evening. Rose Theatre, Jazz at Lincoln Center, 60th and Broadway, 10-16 June, from $20.

Three Way: Sex and the City meets Black Mirror: This new opera imagines the present and future of sex and love. Three Way unfolds in three playful one-acts, with average heroes exploring the worlds of android lovers, BDSM and multiple partners in their search for the ever-elusive emotional connections in today’s romantic world. BAM Fisher, Fishman Space, 321 Ashland Place, Brooklyn, 14-18 June, from $45.

DANCE

Whipped Cream: This inventive full-length premiere springs from the imagination of pop surrealist visionary, Mark Ryden. In it, a young boy overindulges at a Viennese pastry shop, and falls into a delirium. To help the boy escape from his attending physician, the boy dreams of his triumphant rescue by Princess Praline and her court, replete with Princess Tea Flower, Prince Prince Coffee as well as marching Marzipan, concluding in a festive celebration. American Ballet Theater, Metropolitan Opera House, Lincoln Center, 26 June-1 July, from $22.

Alvin Ailey at Lincoln Center: See the Company premiere of Robert Battle's Mass, a powerful ensemble work that sprang from Battle’s fascination with a choral performance of Verdi’s Requiem. Or Global Voices, which showcases the richly varied styles of choreographers from Europe and America, or a trio of diverse American works that share Bold Visions of our world today. Ailey’s beloved Revelations is the uplifting finale of each program. David Koch Theatre, 20 Lincoln Center, 14-18 June, from $25.

Coney Art Walls brings together a large group of some of the best artists who paint outdoor murals. Curated by Jeffrey Dietch, there are more than 20 new pieces this year. 

Coney Art Walls brings together a large group of some of the best artists who paint outdoor murals. Curated by Jeffrey Dietch, there are more than 20 new pieces this year. 

CANVAS

Frank Lloyd Wright at 150 – Unpacking the Archive: Marking the 150th anniversary of the American architect’s birth on 8 June 1867, MoMA presents Frank Lloyd Wright at 150: Unpacking the Archive, a major exhibition that critically engages his multifaceted practice. The exhibition comprises approximately 450 works made from the 1890s through the 1950s, including architectural drawings, models, furniture, paintings, and scrapbooks, along with a number of works that have never been publicly exhibited. Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53rd Street, New York, through 11 October, from $25.

Mystical Symbolism – The Salon de la Rose+Croix in Paris, 1892–1897: In 1892 Joséphin Péladan, a Rosicrucian, author, and critic, organized the first Salon de la Rose+Croix, showcasing mystical Symbolist art at a time when religious and occult practices often intertwined.  Mystical Symbolism will feature about 40 works culled from the six Salon de la Rose+Croix exhibitions, highlighting central artworks shown at each salon in order to tease out themes such as the role of Orpheus and the adulation of the Primitives. Guggenheim, 1071 Fifth Ave., 30 June through 4 October, $25.

Ray Johnson: Johnson’s collage works, which often incorporate celebrity images cut from magazines, are considered among the earliest examples of Pop art. But starting in the late 1970s, with only a few exceptions, he stopped showing his work publicly. It was during Johnson’s reclusive final decades that he created most of the works in this exhibition, working in a nonlinear way, often setting aside a collage for years before picking it up, adding to it, and setting it aside again. Matthew Marks, 523 West 24th Street, Free.

Thomas Trosch – New and Old: Baltimore artist Thomas Trosch is an infrequent exhibitor, but his first solo appearance in New York recasts him as the contemporary painter of an outsider-ish stripe. Trosch focuses on the high society of collectors, situating his often shirtless self in their moneyed midst and improvising scenes packed with detail that relish the excesses and absurdities of the market. Fredericks and Freiser, 536 West 24th Street, through 23 June.  

Eric Fishl – Late America: In these major works, Fischl continues his exploration of moral ambivalence and social malaise against a suburban backdrop. Here, the backyard swimming pool serves as a stage set for a variety of personal dramas that can scale up to reflect a society in crisis. Skarstedt, Chelsea, 550 West 21st Street, through 24 June, Free.  

Coney Art Walls: Coney Art Walls brings together a large group of some of the best artists who paint outdoor murals to provide an art experience that is open and free to the public. The addition of the Smorgasburg team, which has brought a diverse and fun group of food vendors to the site, and an ongoing music program, fully round out the space into a true Coney Island experience. Curated by Jeffrey Dietch, there are more than 20 new pieces this year, including works by Nina Chanel Abney, John Ahearn, Timothy Curtis, Pose, Stephen Powers, Tats Cru, and Sam Vernon. Coney Art Walls, 3050 Stillwell Avenue, through September, Free.

The Times: The Times focuses on works on the paper itself, and includes drawings, paintings, photography, and collage, as well as video, podcasts, and performance. Some artists insert themselves directly in the physical document of the paper, while others are interested in the seriality of the newspaper as a means of marking time, investigating its coded language, or rewriting history. FLAG Art Foundation, 545 West 25th Street, 9th Floor, through 11 August.

A dark and layered romance, My Cousin Rachel tells the story of a young Englishman who plots revenge against his mysterious and beautiful cousin, believing that she murdered his guardian.

A dark and layered romance, My Cousin Rachel tells the story of a young Englishman who plots revenge against his mysterious and beautiful cousin, believing that she murdered his guardian.

CINEMA

Maudie: Based on a true story, Maudie is an unlikely romance in which the reclusive Everett Lewis (Ethan Hawke) hires a fragile yet determined woman named Maudie (Sally Hawkins) to be his housekeeper. Maudie, bright-eyed but hunched with crippled hands, yearns to be independent, to live away from her protective family and she also yearns, passionately, to create art. Lincoln Plaza Cinema, 1886 Broadway, Upper West Side, from $15.

Moka: To find the driver of the vintage mocha-colored Mercedes which she thinks hit her son and devastated her life, Diane Kramer (Emmanuelle Devos) embarks on a trip to take revenge. Film Forum, 209 W Houston St, West Village, from $15.  

Harmonium: Life for Toshio, his wife, and their younger daughter Hotaru carries on as usual until he hires the mysterious Mr. Yasaka, an old acquaintance dressed in white who has just been released from prison, in his workshop. Film Society Lincoln Center, 144 W. 65th Street, from $15.  

The Journey: A fictional account of the extraordinary story of two implacable enemies in Northern Ireland – firebrand Democratic Unionist Party leader Ian Paisley and Sinn Fein politician Martin McGuinness-- who are forced to take a short journey together in which they will take the biggest leap of faith and change the course of history. Lincoln Plaza Cinema, 1886 Broadway, Upper West Side, from $15.

Dawson City – Frozen Time: Pieces together the bizarre true history of a long-lost collection of 533 nitrate film prints dating from the early 1900s. Discovered buried under a hockey rink in a former Klondike Gold Rush town, their story reveals the links between the movie business and Manifest Destiny in North America. IFC Center, 323 6th Ave., West Village, from $15.

Lucky: Having out lived and out smoked all of his contemporaries, the fiercely independent Lucky (Harry Dean Stanton), a 90-year-old atheist, finds himself at the precipice of life, thrust into a journey of self-exploration amid the quirky characters that inhabit his off the map desert town. Village East Cinemas, 181-, 189 2nd Ave, East Village, from $15. 

The Women’s Balcony: The women in an Orthodox Jewish community in Jerusalem are appalled when their synagogue gets a strict new rabbi who preaches rigid gender roles. The ladies soon decide to fight back against his ultratraditionalist beliefs, while raising money to repair the “women's balcony” in the synagogue. Lincoln Plaza Cinema, 1886 Broadway, Upper West Side, from $15. 

Restless Creature – Wendy Whelan: Linda Saffire and Adam Schlesinger’s film follows ballerina Wendy Whelan throughout a passage of life that all dancers must face, when she must confront the limitations of her own body. Film Society Lincoln Center, 144 W. 65th Street, from $15.

Moscow Never Sleeps: A multi-narrative drama about the hidden bonds that connects us all. The film dives headlong into the volatile intersections of contemporary Moscow and the intimate lives of five people. Village East Cinemas, 181-, 189 2nd Ave, East Village, from $15.

Beatriz at Dinner: Beatriz (Salma Hayek), an immigrant from a poor town in Mexico, has drawn on her innate kindness to build a career as a spiritual health practitioner in Los Angeles. Doug Strutt (John Lithgow) is a cutthroat, self-satisfied billionaire real estate developer. When these two opposites meet at a dinner party, their worlds collide and neither will ever be the same. Lincoln Plaza Cinema, 1886 Broadway, Upper West Side, from $15.

My Cousin Rachel: A dark and layered romance, My Cousin Rachel tells the story of a young Englishman who plots revenge against his mysterious and beautiful cousin, believing that she murdered his guardian.  His feelings become complicated as he finds himself falling helplessly and obsessively in love with her. Lincoln Plaza Cinema, 1886 Broadway, Upper West Side, from $15.

Letters from Baghdad: Letters from Baghdad tells the extraordinary and dramatic story of Gertrude Bell, the most powerful woman in the British Empire in her day. She shaped the destiny of Iraq afer World War I in ways that still reverberate today. More influential than her friend and colleague Lawrence of Arabia, why has she been written out of the history she helped make? Lincoln Plaza Cinema, 1886 Broadway, Upper West Side, from $15.

The Exception (The Kaiser’s Last Kiss): German soldier Stefan Brandt is on a mission to investigate exiled German Monarch Kaiser Wilhelm II. As Brandt begins to infiltrate the Kaiser's life in search of clues, he finds himself drawn into an unexpected and passionate romance with Mieke, one of the Kaiser's maids whom Brandt soon discovers is secretly Jewish. Lincoln Plaza Cinema, 1886 Broadway, Upper West Side, from $15.

Band Aid: Band Aid is the story of a couple, Anna and Ben who can't stop fighting. Advised by their therapist to try and work through their grief unconventionally, in a last-ditch effort to save their marriage, they decide to turn all their fights into song, and with the help of their neighbor Dave (Fred Armisen), they start a band. IFC Center, 323 6th Ave., West Village, from $15.